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An article in Fast Company magazine said it best:

Truth is, the way an organization communicates can be the difference between success and failure.
 
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In the nearly 20 years I've been consulting, I've noticed the follow communications-related patterns, some of which are acknowledged in the article:

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In the nearly 20 years I've been consulting, I've noticed the follow communications-related patterns, some of which are acknowledged in the article:

 

1.  Humans in business use the excuse of “being too busy” to make communications a priority with internal + external audiences.

2.  Communicating key business strategies, goals + news to employees is often an afterthought rather than a priority.

3.  Communication efforts within company walls often lack empathy, compassion + emotional intelligence.

4.  Communication efforts outside company walls frequently lack a game plan that embraces consistent messaging + branding.

5.  Like many other soft skills, communication tends to be undervalued because it’s difficult to measure.

 

Short-term implications of not making communications a priority compound over time and eventually lead to severe disengagement within organizations. According to Officevibe, 70 percent of U.S. workers aren’t engaged and only 40 percent of employees know their company’s goals.

 
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The choice to make communication
a priority begins with you.

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The choice to make communication
a priority begins with you.

 

Communication, like good health, is taken for granted - until it isn’t there. If you’re in a leadership position, you set the example for effective communication - something that’s about more than just exchanging information. It’s about understanding the emotion + intentions behind the information. Effective communication combines a set of four skills:

  • Engaged listening
  • Nonverbal communication
  • Managing stress in the moment
  • Asserting yourself in a respectful way

These are learnable skills that take time + effort to develop.

If you’re in a non-leadership position within a company, you can become a communication advocate within + outside your organization.

Regardless of your position, making the choice to become a more effective communicator will transition you from being an unconscious communicator to an intentional one. You’re less likely to deliver messages that get twisted in the delivery process + misunderstood by others. Instead, you’ll communicate more instinctively.

 
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Engage fullCIRCLE as a resource for:

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Engage fullCIRCLE as a resource for:

 
kim waltman fullcircle consulting
 
 

Emotional intelligence (EQ) presentations + training

Facilitation

Content development

Marketing + communications planning

 

Here's what creative clients have to say:

Creative Services

In a world of quick fixes and cookie-cutter solutions, Kim is a breath of fresh air. She helps us dig deep into who we are as a small business. She makes time to get to know us as a business and as individuals and gives thoughtful guidance. I’m grateful for the custom solutions we’ve created to address the issues unique to our business. Tom Foldes, PE, President, Principal, Bluestone Engineering

Emotional Intelligence Training

Kim led a high-energy, interactive discussion about Emotional Intelligence (EQ) with men and women through the Des Moines WomenREACH Employee Resource Group. Many of the members were familiar with the concept of EQ, yet we were curious about why it’s showing up in the workplace with increased frequency and wanted to know how to implement it on a daily basis. We discovered the benefit of being more aware, intentional and purposeful with emotions and the importance of each individual taking responsibility for regulating them. Rose Christenson, Instructional Designer

Your presentation on emotional intelligence in the workplace and in our lives was very thoughtful and inspirational. I love how you were very authentic and gracious when asking for our input plus made sure that those who shared were listened to and felt valued by you. As we all head down our different paths of entrepreneurship, your advice on mindful choices, self-recognition and communication skills will serve us well. DreamBuilder series participant, Iowa Center for Economic Success Women’s Business Center

Facilitating Group Discussion

You are incredibly authentic when it comes to connecting with your clients. You have this beautiful way of making people feel welcome, asking them to be mindful of the work they do, provide them with clarity for any project and they trust you and what you have to say. You are very intentional with how you do the work, and you don’t start from a concrete end goal because you walk in knowing that that may change based on the work you do with each individual client or company.” Emily, non-profit executive

I participated in the FocusME session facilitated by Kim as a new employee of the Iowa Center for Economic Success. Through this class and Kim's gentle guidance I took much needed time to evaluate "where I am, where am I going and is this really the path I want to be on?" I learned that we, as a society, are so fixated on 'doing' that we have disengaged and devalued our 'being' selves in our home and work spaces. I appreciated the atmosphere of support and found this class to be a great resource for my professional and personal development. Claire Reiman, client opportunities coordinator, Iowa Center for Economic Success

I like Kim’s style and how she gets from point A to point B in a very direct manner that gets the job done but does not offend anyone. That is absolute skill not many have. Heidi Wessels, FIN Capital

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Creative blog posts


learn more from the blog

Creative blog posts


learn more from the blog

 

Are you interested in learning more about fullCIRCLE’s creative services?

 
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fullcircle's 3-step process to do hard things

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fullcircle's 3-step process to do hard things

 

Learning to communicate more effectively + instinctively is a rewarding process. It begins with making a choice to grow + embracing the five main elements of emotional intelligence* (EQ):

  • Self-awareness
  • Self-regulation
  • Motivation
  • Empathy
  • Social skills

*According to psychologist Daniel Goleman

This simple, 3-step process to alter the trajectory of how we communicate is the result of decades in the communications field learning how much emotions impact what humans say.

I’m here to walk beside growth-minded, faithful + highly motivated humans committed to restoring their spirits so they can communicate more effectively + create harmony in their personal + professional lives.

Step 1: Show Up

Consider:
“The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”  Richard Feynman, American physicist and Nobel Laureate

Then, make the choice to ‘show up’ - to take one step toward personal + professional growth. To ‘show up’ is the willingness to check our emotions, be vulnerable, confident + exposed while doing what we know is right, regardless of the outcome. All you need to do to ‘show up’ is schedule a free, 30-minute phone consultation. Call 515.229.0429 or get in touch through the Contact page.

Step 2: Step In

Ponder:
“If you are distressed by anything external, the pain is not due to the thing itself, but your estimate of it, and this you have the power to revoke any moment.” Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antonius

To ‘step in’ is to put ourselves in a place that may result in discomfort. It’s typically the mere thought of what we think could happen that cripples our decision-making ability. By ‘stepping in’ and facing our fears, we simultaneously release what’s paralyzing us and create an opportunity for growth.

Step 3: Commit

Contemplate:
“Change has considerable psychological impact on the human mind. To the fearful it is threatening because it means that things may get worse. To the hopeful it is encouraging because things may get better. To the confident it is inspiring because the challenge exists to make things better.” King Whitney, Jr. Businessman

To ‘commit’ is to pledge to a certain way of being. It obligates you to carry out a course of action. Choosing to commit is powerful because it influences how you think, sound + act. It’s a script for how to handle hard things. Doing hard things leads to growth. And growth is something we have the power to choose again and again. When we embrace growth + improvement, we learn what it means to have the grit needed to push our limits, strengthen beneficial neural connections and create entirely new ones.

 
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Are you or your organization ready to learn about EQ, its impact on communication + how you can transition to being a more effective communicator? I consider it a privilige to guide you through the process.

Get in touch

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Are you or your organization ready to learn about EQ, its impact on communication + how you can transition to being a more effective communicator? I consider it a privilige to guide you through the process.

Get in touch

 

Learn more about my coaching services:

Learn more about EQ, workplace skills and more: